Hepatitis C

Hepatitis C is an infection of the liver caused by the hepatitis C virus. Some people with hepatitis C don't have symptoms. If it is left untreated, it can lead to serious, lifelong illness and life-threatening complications.

  • About half of people who are infected with hepatitis C don't know that they have it. People infected with hepatitis C often have no symptoms.
  • Hepatitis C is spread by contact with blood infected with the virus. The most common ways it spreads are by sharing needles, syringes, or other drug injection supplies, or through needle stick injuries in health care settings.
  • Hepatitis C is treatable. Over 90% of patients who complete their treatment are cured. Getting tested could save your life. Take a look at this questionnaire to find out if you are at risk and should get tested for hepatitis A, B or C.

Have you been diagnosed with hepatitis C and want to learn more about treatment options in the community? Email us


Symptoms

Many people who have hepatitis C don't have symptoms and don't know they are infected. People with hepatitis C might have these symptoms:

  • Fever.
  • Fatigue.
  • Loss of appetite.
  • Nausea.
  • Vomiting.
  • Stomach pain.
  • Gray colored poop.
  • Joint pain.
  • Jaundice (yellow eyes or skin).


How It Spreads

Hepatitis C virus is spread by contact with contaminated blood. The most common ways it spreads are by sharing needles, syringes, or other drug injection supplies. Other less common ways it spreads are:

  • Needle stick injuries.
  • Sexual contact with an infected person.
  • During childbirth.
  • Sharing items like razors or toothbrushes that might have contacted blood.

Some people are more at risk for hepatitis C than others:

  • Current or former injection drug users.
  • People born between 1945 and 1965.
  • People who are infected with HIV.
  • Infants born to infected mothers.
  • Long-term hemodialysis patients.

Take a look at this questionnaire to find out if you are at risk and should test for hepatitis A, B or C.


Prevention

There is no vaccine for hepatitis C, but there are ways to reduce your risk:

  • Avoid injection drug use. If you inject drugs, use sterile injection equipment, and don't share equipment with others.
  • Avoid direct exposure to blood or blood products.
  • Avoid sharing personal care items like toothbrushes, razors, or nail clippers.
  • Choose professional/licensed tattoo and piercing artists.
  • Practice safe sex.


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